Tips For Choosing The Best Window Tint

When choosing window film, the number of options available is overwhelming. At Rayno Window Film, we want you to know how to choose window tint that will meet your needs, yet we know how frustrating it can be to have so many choices available.

Auto window tint provides a way to protect your car’s interior from sun damage, reduce glare while driving, and improve the overall look of your vehicle. Window tint can also reduce heat in the vehicle, which is beneficial to those who live in hot climates or who regularly park outside. Yet not all window tint products are created equal, and the best window tint products are sometimes hard to distinguish in a crowded marketplace.

Here are some tips to help you choose the best car window tint and window film that will give you all of the benefits you want and the longevity you need.

Types of Window Tint

The first step in narrowing down your window tint choices is understanding the different types of window film on the market today. Window tinting for car windows falls in two basic categories: non-reflective film and metalized film. Non-reflective film provides both heat and glare control through solar absorption. One of the most common and traditional non-reflective films is dyed films and they provide increased optical quality and clarity through strong glare control. Dyed films are less effective in controlling solar heat absorption compared to metalized films that reflect the solar energy. Metalized films reflect the sun to keep it from damaging and heating the car’s interior and also help provide privacy. Though in some states, metallic, reflective tinting is not legal Non-reflective film provides shade in instances when reflective tinting is not allowed or in the case of vehicles with navigational equipment like boats or RVs — when the reflective coating may impact the function of the vehicle and interfere with cell phones, radar detectors or GPS.

In addition to these basic categories, the actual material used to tint car windows varies. The materials used to create window tint also vary from one product to the next. The three main materials are dyed film, carbon film, and ceramic film. Dyed film is the most cost-effective option, but has the highest chance of needing replacement. Carbon film is dense and strong and has a low discoloration rate, but can create problems with glare and haze. Ceramic film limits these problems and has a high heat rejection, but it tends to oxidize quickly and can fade. Rayno Window Film offers a fourth option; nano carbon ceramic, an innovative new hybrid of both carbon and ceramic, combines the benefits of both parent types while minimizing the drawbacks, making this a favorite choice among car owners who want longevity and good function.

Features of Window Film

As you’re considering the various types and styles of window tint for your car, you will need to understand the various window film choices in order to choose the right one. Breaking down your options based on the features of the various products on the market may help. Some of the features you may look for include:

    • Shade — The shade is the color of the window tint. You will want a tint that is in line with state laws — as many states ban certain colors — and is aesthetically pleasing to your vehicle’s overall look.
    • Color stability — How well will the color hold up over years of exposure to UV radiation? Look for window tint choices with long color stability. A color stability rating of less than 1 is excellent.
    • Clarity — For your safety, you need window film for your car that offers clear visibility, reducing reflection and improving clarity during the day and at night.
    • Solar control — If it’s too hot inside your car, solar control is critical. Excessive heat creates an atmosphere that’s uncomfortable and unsafe for your car’s interior.

Which window tint is best? One that has good solar control, good clarity and good color stability — and comes in a shade that you like.

Car Window Tint Colors

Car window tint can come in a number of colors, with black, charcoal, gray, gold, and bronze being popular.

  • Black car window tint can make your car feel like a luxury vehicle.
  • Gray car window tint is made to blend in with the windows so it looks natural and elegant.
  • Charcoal is similar to gray but offers a more rich and slightly brown color to it.
  • Bronze car window tint is popular with Acura and Lexus owners.
  • Gold car window tints offer a stylish classy look that is sure to make an impression.

UV Protection

UV rays pass through window glass and cause damage and fading to your car’s interior. When you are sitting in your car, it can also damage your skin. The best window tinting products are UV rejecting, and this can protect your skin and your car’s interior from 99 percent of the UV rays from the sun. Nano carbon ceramic tints, like those offered through Rayno Window Film, provide superior UV light protection to keep you and your car’s interior safe.

State Laws

When choosing window film, be certain to check the laws in your state. Each state has specific laws about color, reflectivity percentages, window tint percentages and other features of window tint that may or may not be allowed. Click here to check the laws in your state. Many states do not allow metallic, reflective tinting on vehicles.

The Right Installer

If you are going to have your windows tinted, working with a qualified installer is important to ensure that the job is done right. While you can get DIY kits for window tinting, you will find that professional tinting is more affordable than you might think, and can save you money in the long run. Depending on the windows you choose to tint and the type of tint purchased, expect to spend between $100 and $500+ for window tinting. The signs of bad installation appear rather quickly after installation, and the quality of the film itself plays a large factor in whether or not the film will last after its installation When installed quality proven films by a professional installer, the window tint should last for many years, so you will not have repeated costs until the tint begins to fade and needs to be replaced.

Choose Rayno Window Film For Excellent Options and Longevity

As you are considering how to choose car tint, remember that the longevity and durability of the product is the most important feature. Rayno Window Film is one of the best choices on the market because our unique technology gives a longer-lasting, fade-protected product that will serve your car well for its expected lifetime. If you are interested in having the industry’s leading window tint installed on your vehicle by a qualified industry professional, contact one of our dealers for more information, or learn more about the benefits of our nano carbon ceramic technology. We have multiple dealerships across the country using Rayno Window Film products to provide you with the ultimate tinting options.

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Can Car Window Tint Block UV Rays? Which Film Offers UV Protection?

It’s common knowledge that ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is highly dangerous. Yet sun exposure doesn’t just happen when you are outdoors, it can also happen through the window of your car. It’s true that UV rays can go through glass. In fact, the majority of Americans receive most of their sun exposure when driving. As a result, doctors have found that sun damage is more common on the left side of an adult, because that is the side exposed to the sun while driving.

If you’re looking for a uv window film for your car, keep reading.

The Scoop on UV Radiation: What Do UV Rays Do to Your Skin?

UV rays damage skin on the cellular level, causing damage that leads to wrinkles, age spots and leathering. UV waves are responsible for up to 90 percent of all skin cancers. They can also damage a car’s interior, fading the upholstery and panels. Unfortunately, the windows and windshield in your car may not be sufficiently UV resistant, leaving you and your children exposed. Clear auto glass in the side windows only blocks about 37 percent of UVA radiation, which is why you are at risk, even in the safety of your car.

Auto Window Tint Adds Protection From UV Radiation

Some may be asking: “How can I block UV rays in my car?” One way to protect your car and its occupants is to have your car fitted with UV window film. These tinting products are uniquely designed to absorb or reflect UV rays, preventing them from entering the vehicle. Many types of car window tint filter or block UV rays, blocking as much as 99 percent depending on the product, so you can enjoy your car without worrying about UV radiation exposure. Window tint is effective enough at preventing UV damage that the Skin Cancer Foundation recommends window tinting as part of a full and proactive skin care program, and one study found a 93 percent reduction in skin cancer deaths after UV exposure in cars was blocked with UV filtering glass.

Not All Window Tints Provide UV Protection

Unfortunately, window tinting can be a waste of money if you don’t choose the right tint, because some window tint is entirely cosmetic, and window tint percentages refer to the amount of light allowed in, not the amount of UV protection provided. If you want to ensure your car is safe from UV rays, be sure to shop specifically for window tinting with UV-blocking capabilities.

Our Best UV Blocking Window Film for Your Car

Rayno Window Film’s Phantom Series uses new nano carbon ceramic technology to create more durable solutions offering exceptional UV and infrared ray filtering — reducing rays by as much as 99 percent. In laboratory tests, researchers found that the amount of Total Solar Energy Rejected (TSER) by Phantom Series window films was 60 percent higher than that of the leading competitor.

A list of our car window UV protection film are listed below. All of these films block 99% of UVA and UVB rays. You can be rest assured you will get superior UV protection for your car windows if you install any of these films.

  • Phantom S9: This is our top-of-the line film and is our best performing in our Phantom Series line. It has an infrared (IR) rejection of 90% or higher. That means it blocks over 90% of the heat you can feel. You will feel coolest in your car with this film.
  • Phantom S7: This is our mid-tier film in our Phantom Series. It has an infrared (IR) rejection of 70% or higher. That means it blocks over 70% of the heat you can feel.
  • Phantom S5: This is our third-tier. It has an infrared (IR) rejection of 50% or higher. That means it blocks over 50% of the heat you can feel. Even blocking half of the heat will make a huge difference in your comfort!
  • MonoCarbon: This film is a great option for first time car buyers or people new to window tint. This film is our nano carbon film without ceramic and has an IR rejection of 34% or higher. MonoCarbon is an affordable option for a quality film that will keep its color over time and keep you cool, as well!

If you are looking for UV car window film that provides auto glass UV protection, our Rayno Phantom Series is the ideal product. Find a dealer today, and take the steps necessary to make your car as safe as possible.

Window Tint Percentage Laws In The US By State

Window tinting on our vehicles is something we’ve grown accustomed to. It is one of the more popular car upgrades today. In some states, it’s near necessary.  Modern car windows are treated using a special polyester material called window tint. It’s meant to protect passengers from UV (UltraViolet) rays of the sun.

Many car owners have window tint for protection from the sun, privacy, and other benefits. Even as a customization feature for improved looks and style. Today, “black is the new black” and dark tint is one of people’s all-time favorite colors. If you want that extra dark limo tint, though, be careful and check your state laws below first. Many states have laws prohibiting the level of tint that allowed.

Window film can add aesthetic value to your car and reduce the glare from the sun. Tinting windows can also protect your car’s interior. It can also protect the people inside from the damage of UV rays.

While window tint offers other benefits, one potential drawback is poor visibility for drivers if the tint is too dark. On the other hand, law enforcement and police can’t see inside your car. Every state has window tint laws to dictate how much tinting is allowed on each window of your vehicle. These state laws allow drivers to use window tint and keep everyone around them safe.

Here is a breakdown of the different car window tinting laws and regulations by state. This information can help you make the right choices for your car. As you read these laws, remember that window tint percentages refer to the amount of light allowed in.  This is also known as the Visible Light Transmission (VLT) percent. The windshield tinting laws refer to the amount of the windshield that can be legally tinted or the amount of tint allowed on the entire windshield, depending on the state’s regulations.

Here are the window tint laws, including the darkest legal tint percentages in your state. Click your state below to jump the chart: California, Texas, Florida, Illinois, New York, Michigan, Virginia.

State Front Side Windows Back Side Windows Rear Windows Windshield Reflectivity Other Restrictions
Alabama 32% 32% 32% 6 inches no more than 20% reflective none
Alaska 70% 40% 40% 5 inches no metallic or mirrored tinting no red, yellow or amber tinting allowed
Arizona 33% any any tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 35% reflective red and amber not permitted, back window tinting requires the use of dual side mirrors
Arkansas
25%
25% 10% 5 inches no metallic or mirrored tinting none
California 70% any any 4 inches no more reflective than a standard window red, amber, and blue not allowed. dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Colorado 27% 27% 27% 4 inches no metallic or mirrored tinting red and amber not permitted, back window tinting requires the use of dual side mirrors
Connecticut 35% 35% any non-reflective tint above the as-1 line no more than 21% reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Delaware 70% any any non-reflective tint above the as-1 line no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Florida 28% 15% 15% non-reflective tint allowed above the as-1 line no more than 25% reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Georgia 32% 32% 32% 6 inches no more than 20% reflective red and amber not allowed
Hawaii 35% 35% 35% no inch requirent, must allow 70% of light no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Idaho 35% 20% 35% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 35% reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Illinois 35% 35% 35% 6 inches must be non-reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Indiana 30% 30% 30% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 25% reflective none
Iowa 70% any any tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no excessive reflections allowed, but not specified none
Kansas 35% 35% 35% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no metallic or mirrored tinting red, amber and yellow are prohibited and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Kentucky 35% 18% 18% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 25% reflective none
Louisiana 40% 25% 12% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 20% reflective none
Maine 35% any any 4 inches must be non-reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Maryland 35% 35% 35% 5 inches no law red, amber and yellow are prohibited and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Massachusetts 35% 35% 35% 6 inches no more than 35% reflective must have dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Michigan any percent, but only 4 inches from the top of window any any 4 inches no more than 35% reflective none
Minnesota 50% 50% 50% none allowed no more than 20% reflective none
Mississippi 28% 28% 28% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 20% reflective none
Missouri 35% any any tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 35% reflective must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Montana 24% 14% 14% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 35% reflective none
Nebraska 35% 20% 20% 5 inches or as-1 line, whichever comes first no more than 35% reflective unclear on side mirrors, but red, amber and yellow are not permitted
Nevada 35% any any tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no law dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
New Hampshire no tinting allowed 35% 35% 6 inches no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
New Jersey no tinting allowed any any no tint allowed no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
New Mexico 20% 20% 20% 5 inches or as-1 line, whichever comes first no law dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
New York 70% 70% any 6 inches no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
North Carolina 35% 35% 35% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 20% reflective red, amber and yellow are prohibited and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
North Dakota 50% any any no more than 70% no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Ohio 50% any any no more than 70% no more reflective than a standard window none
Oklahoma
25% 25% 25% 5 inches or as-1 line, whichever comes first no more than 20% reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Oregon 35% 35% 35% 6 inches no more than 13% reflective red, green, yellow, black and amber tints are not allowed, and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Pennsylvania 70% 70% 70% none allowed no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Rhode Island 70% 70% 70% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no law none
South Carolina 27% 27% 27% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line must be non-reflective red, amber and yellow are prohibited and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
South Dakota 35% 20% 20% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no metallic or mirrored tinting none
Tennessee 35% 35% 35% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no metallic or mirrored tinting none
Texas 25% 25% any 5 inches or as-1 line, whichever comes first no more than 25% reflective red, amber, and blue not allowed. dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Utah 43% any any tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Vermont no tinting allowed any any tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no metallic or mirrored tinting dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Virginia 50% 35% 35% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no more than 20% reflective red, amber and yellow are prohibited and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Washington 24% 24% 24% 6 inches no more than 35% reflective red, green, yellow, black and amber tints are not allowed, and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Washington D.C. 70% 50 percent for cars, 35 percent for multi-purpose vehicles 50 percent for cars, 35 percent for multi-purpose vehicles 5 inches or as-1 line, whichever comes first no law none
West Virginia 35% 35% 35% 5 inches 20% reflective red, amber and yellow are prohibited and must have dual side mirrors for back tinted windows
Wisconsin 50% 35% 35% tinting allowed to the top of the manufacturer’s as-1 line no law dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows
Wyoming 28% 28% 28% 5 inches or as-1 line, whichever comes first no more than 20% reflective dual side mirrors required for back tinted windows

For more detailed information and up-to-date state laws, visit this page. New York just recently updated its state tint law for 2018. To learn more about these specific changes, visit our 2018 New York tint laws page.

At-A-Glance: Legal Window Tint Percentage Levels in the US by State

legal window tint infographic

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Why is window tint illegal in some states?

Most states prohibit window tinting for safety and security purposes. Tinting limits the amount of light that enters the car but can make it hard to view the street. Limited vision leads to an increased number of accidents on the road. The other reason why tinting may be illegal is for public safety when it comes to the police and other federal agencies. Extremely dark tint can be obstructive to investigations, and dangerous during traffic stops and other incidents.

Can one get pulled over for having tinted windows?

The answer is, sometimes. It is entirely dependent on the state one is in and the laws that govern that state. Many states have legalized some degree of tinting. Tinting done in the lines of these laws is permitted so you would not get pulled over. If the tint laws that are in place are not followed, you may be subject to being pulled over. In other states, tinting is entirely illegal. Any form of illegal tinting would attract negative attention from law enforcement. You need to understand and follow the laws of your state, as they do vary.

Is limo tint (blacked out tint) legal?

In the US, the tinting laws vary from state to state defined by the Department of Motor Vehicles in each location. Taking the state of California for example, the rules permit the tinting of the front passenger window only up to 70%. This means that these windows should allow a minimum of 70% visible light through them. This means that ‘limo tint’ is not permitted on these windows.

California window tint law

It is generally sunny all year round, so it is common for cars in California to have tint. California window tint must meet specific requirements under the state’s law.

Here are the laws you must abide by in the state of California:

  • Use a tint that is green, gray, or neutral smoke in color.
  • Have a luminous transmittance of at least 70%. The legal VLT % in California is 70% VLT.
  • Must not increase reflectivity for front and back windows.

Learn more details on our California window tint laws page.

Front window tint strip law

The ‘eyebrow’ (the little strip on the car’s windshield) is also permitted as long as it meets your state’s laws. These small front window tint strips ensure that the driver has enough visibility of their surroundings. While on the road, you can get some protection from the sun. Some state laws also prohibit the installation of windows that are not tinted which results in some specified degree of light reflection. Front window tint strip laws vary by state so please refer to the chart above to see if it is allowed in your state.

35% vs 20% vs 5%. What are the differences?

The restrictions on the amount of visible light being transmitted into a car are defined and measured in percentages. These different percentages are the minimum amount of light that should be getting through the glass.  The higher percentage means the tint is lighter. A lower tint percentage means the tint is darker. The legal percentage varies from state to state and also for the different windows of the car.

Medical Exemptions and Waivers for Window Tint

These laws are ‘bent’ for people with medical conditions that make them more sensitive to light than the average person. A perfect example would be people with albinism who need always to be protected from the sun. Other diseases such as Psoriasis might affect people. While sunlight can benefit some people with psoriasis, there are people who will have a negative reaction towards UV radiation. People with Rosacea, as well, might be able to get a medical exemption. Rosacea might cause increased sensitivity (especially to the sun) and inflammation of your face.  If you have any of these conditions, obtain a medical letter from your doctor. Keep it in the car for law enforcement and police.

Like all laws, the regulations regarding window tint on your vehicle are there for your safety and the safety of those around you. Always be sure to check your state’s laws before applying window tint.

If you are shopping for window film tint for your car, make sure you work with a company that understands these window tinting rules or tint percentages and how they affect your car’s window tint. Rayno Window Film is here to help you, and our crew is fully compliant with all state regulations. By staying within the car window tint laws, you will be able to enjoy the benefits of window tinting without running the risk of an unwanted or unexpected citation. Contact us today to get started.

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